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Tag Archive: Nit-Picking

Youthful Problems

Youthful Problems

Have you ever played Rise of the Tomb Raider? If not, no worries, there are plenty of examples of what I’m about to talk about in other media. Anyway, in this specific game the main character of Lara Croft talks about a MacGuffin that can unlock the secrets of immortality for humankind, talking about how it would change everything, stop sickness and disease, and all the usual nonsense people think up in these situations.

So let’s think for a moment about why this line of thinking is naïve and catastrophically flawed. First, yes, the basic premise Lara is discussing here is correct; a fountain of youth or other immortality device would have the potential to change the world and, more appropriately, humankind. But for the better?

Hardly. It’s true that a variety of human maladies could feasibly be either eradicated or heavily improved by something like this, but given humanity’s bloody and unpleasant history, do you honestly believe this is the outcome we could expect?

The very second people got wind of a panacea of this nature, there’d be instant riots and civil unrest as people claw and beat and kill their way to the top of the pile, hoping to be the one to capitalise on such a wonder treatment for the human condition. Those with power would suppress those without, and they’d fight anyone else with power in order to fully restrict who had access to this miracle medicine (i.e. no one but them).

But let’s say for sake of argument that the governments of the world came together in a spirit of cooperation and refined a new drug to grant immortality and immunity to all disease. How would that go? (more…)

Yurika

Yurika S. Grant is a writer and yuri lover who writes lesbian fiction and lives in the sunny yet unbelievably flat East Midlands. Secretly a witch.

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The Trouble With Time Travel

Have you ever noticed in science fiction stories involving time machines, that the machines in question seem to defy all logical explanation? And I don’t just mean the physics of time travel, though that’s an interesting topic by itself. No, what I mean is how the machine seems to ignore physical location when travelling through time.

In any story, a degree of narrative convenience is necessary simply for the sake of having the story happen. But one convenience—or more accurately, contrivance—time travel stories too often suffer from is failing to take into account the fact that Earth is a celestial body travelling at some 67,000 MPH. It wouldn’t be in the same place when travelling through time!

Let’s say you build a time machine in your London flat’s basement. You climb in, start the machine up, and decide that as a simple test you’ll go back in time by precisely 24 hours. So where was the Earth 24 hours ago? If it travels 67,000 miles every single hour, then multiplying that by 24 gives us a rough figure of 1,608,000 miles travelled.

Our scientist, who probably isn’t very bright if he’s not thought about this issue, sits in his machine, prods the buttons, sets the Flux Capacitor just so, and hits the big red GO! button. He travels back 24 hours to the exact same spot he’s in right now. Unfortunately, the spot he’s in right now is based on the position of Earth right now as well, not the Earth of 24 hours ago.

As a result, he appears in space and immediate dies from being exposed to hard vacuum. This is something I’ve never actually seen mentioned or explored in any show, book, or movie that deals with time travel, and it’s a fairly major issue that I feel should be explored. (If you do know of any fiction works where this is addressed, I’d love to hear about it!) (more…)

Yurika

Yurika S. Grant is a writer and yuri lover who writes lesbian fiction and lives in the sunny yet unbelievably flat East Midlands. Secretly a witch.

Support me on Patreon.
Donate to my Ko-fi.
Follow me on Minds.com.
Please share! Every retweet, like, or remind helps loads, thanks!